Hole in our soul: the loss of beauty and meaning in American popular music
(Book)

Book Cover
Published:
Chicago : University of Chicago Press, 1996.
Format:
Book
ISBN:
0226039595, 9780226039596
Physical Desc:
viii, 453 pages ; 23 cm
Status:
CCU Circulating Books (off-campus)
ML 3477 .B39 1996
Description

From Queen Latifa to Count Basie, Madonna to Monk, Hole in Our Soul: The Loss of Beauty and Meaning in American Popular Music traces popular music back to its roots in jazz, blues, country, and gospel through the rise in rock 'n' roll and the emergence of heavy metal, punk, and rap. Yet despite the vigor and balance of these musical origins, Martha Bayles argues, something has gone seriously wrong, both with the sound of popular music and the sensibility it expresses. Bayles defends the tough, affirmative spirit of Afro-American music against the strain of artistic modernism she calls 'perverse.' She describes how perverse modernism was grafted onto popular music in the late 1960s, and argues that the result has been a cult of brutality and obscenity that is profoundly anti-musical. Unlike other recent critics of popular music, Bayles does not blame the problem on commerce. She argues that culture shapes the market and not the other way around. Finding censorship of popular music "both a practical and a constitutional impossibility," Bayles insists that "an informed shift in public tastes may be our only hope of reversing the current malignant mood."

Copies
Location
Call Number
Status
Last Check-In
CCU Circulating Books (off-campus)
ML 3477 .B39 1996
On Shelf
Mar 10, 2020
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Citations
APA Citation (style guide)

Bayles, M. (1996). Hole in our soul: the loss of beauty and meaning in American popular music. Chicago, University of Chicago Press.

Chicago / Turabian - Author Date Citation (style guide)

Bayles, Martha. 1996. Hole in Our Soul: The Loss of Beauty and Meaning in American Popular Music. Chicago, University of Chicago Press.

Chicago / Turabian - Humanities Citation (style guide)

Bayles, Martha, Hole in Our Soul: The Loss of Beauty and Meaning in American Popular Music. Chicago, University of Chicago Press, 1996.

MLA Citation (style guide)

Bayles, Martha. Hole in Our Soul: The Loss of Beauty and Meaning in American Popular Music. Chicago, University of Chicago Press, 1996.

Note! Citation formats are based on standards as of July 2022. Citations contain only title, author, edition, publisher, and year published. Citations should be used as a guideline and should be double checked for accuracy.
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Language:
English

Notes

General Note
Originally published: New York : Free Press, c1994.
Bibliography
Includes bibliographical references and index.
Description
From Queen Latifa to Count Basie, Madonna to Monk, Hole in Our Soul: The Loss of Beauty and Meaning in American Popular Music traces popular music back to its roots in jazz, blues, country, and gospel through the rise in rock 'n' roll and the emergence of heavy metal, punk, and rap. Yet despite the vigor and balance of these musical origins, Martha Bayles argues, something has gone seriously wrong, both with the sound of popular music and the sensibility it expresses. Bayles defends the tough, affirmative spirit of Afro-American music against the strain of artistic modernism she calls 'perverse.' She describes how perverse modernism was grafted onto popular music in the late 1960s, and argues that the result has been a cult of brutality and obscenity that is profoundly anti-musical. Unlike other recent critics of popular music, Bayles does not blame the problem on commerce. She argues that culture shapes the market and not the other way around. Finding censorship of popular music "both a practical and a constitutional impossibility," Bayles insists that "an informed shift in public tastes may be our only hope of reversing the current malignant mood."
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a39f3aa5-30ca-81a2-1e2f-bb44029813e7
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Record Information

Last Sierra Extract TimeJan 09, 2023 11:01:37 AM
Last File Modification TimeJan 09, 2023 11:16:40 AM
Last Grouped Work Modification TimeJan 09, 2023 11:01:49 AM

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5050 |a Introduction -- Why music is the wild card -- The three strains of modernism -- The obstacle of race -- The taint of commerce -- Cubists and squares : jazz as modernism -- The strange career of 1950s rock 'n' roll -- Rock 'n' rollers of holy rollers? -- Reaction and revitalization -- Another country heard from -- Blues, blacks, and Brits -- Words and music : the rise of the counterculture -- Art and religion, 1960s style -- Hard rock becomes a hard place -- Soul loses its soul -- Their art belongs to Dada -- Punk : the great avant-garde swindle -- High on high tech -- Rap : trying to make it real (compared to what?) -- You don't miss your water (till your well runs dry) -- Coda : escape from postmoderism.
5200 |a From Queen Latifa to Count Basie, Madonna to Monk, Hole in Our Soul: The Loss of Beauty and Meaning in American Popular Music traces popular music back to its roots in jazz, blues, country, and gospel through the rise in rock 'n' roll and the emergence of heavy metal, punk, and rap. Yet despite the vigor and balance of these musical origins, Martha Bayles argues, something has gone seriously wrong, both with the sound of popular music and the sensibility it expresses. Bayles defends the tough, affirmative spirit of Afro-American music against the strain of artistic modernism she calls 'perverse.' She describes how perverse modernism was grafted onto popular music in the late 1960s, and argues that the result has been a cult of brutality and obscenity that is profoundly anti-musical. Unlike other recent critics of popular music, Bayles does not blame the problem on commerce. She argues that culture shapes the market and not the other way around. Finding censorship of popular music "both a practical and a constitutional impossibility," Bayles insists that "an informed shift in public tastes may be our only hope of reversing the current malignant mood."
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